Tuesday, 24 May 2011

Unite Against Fascism - Wikid






Contents:


i) Introduction

ii) Supporters and Leaders

iii) History

iv) UAF and Violence

v) UAF and the English Defence League

vi) Conclusion




Introduction

Unite Against Fascism is an anti-fascist organisation in the United Kingdom that campaigns against right wing and fascist organisations.

It is against all examples of fascism except brown fascism, black fascism, Islamo-fascism, Arab fascism, red fascism and other such fascisms. It says that

‘brown oppressed people can never be fascist or racist.’

and that

‘only white people can be fascists and racists’ (the Israelis are ‘white’).

Commentators have responded by saying that ‘the SWP red fascists are white’. The leader of UAF replied to this by saying that ‘white middle-class students and professionals become brown if they are fighting for oppressed brown people’.

UAF says its aim is to

‘campaign with the aim of alerting British society to the rising threat of the extreme right, in particular the far right British National Party, gaining an electoral foothold in this country’.

UAF has said that

‘it would prefer if the Socialist Workers Party gained an electoral foothold in this country instead.’

and that ‘it is not in its remit to alert British society to the rising threat of the extreme left’ (or the fascist tactics of Islamic terrorists). This is partly because extreme-left anti-Semitism and Islamic anti-Semitism is not racism because, as stated earlier, Jews are both ‘white’ (even the black ones) and ‘oppressers’.

Supporters and Leaders

The chairman of UAF is the left-wing politician Ken Livingstone. He is well-known for supporting red fascists, Islamo-fascists (such as Yusuf Al-Qaradawi) and any brown extremist he can lay his hands on (which is not a nice thought). Red Ken used to focus on other identity groups like lesbians and gays until he realised that his new-found reactionary Muslim friends wanted to kill them.

The UAF joint secretary, Weyman Bennet, is a well-known anti-racist and anti-Semite who has even been classed as ‘mad’ by his fellow far leftists. He once said that ‘Jews should go back to New York’ – even though many Israeli Jews (or their ancestors) have been in the Middle East for over two thousand years. He is also on the Central Committee of the red-fascist group, the Socialist Workers Party. Another leader of the UAF, Martin Smith, was also the National Secretary of the SWP. However, UAF has said that it has no connection to the SWP despite the fact that nearly every one of its leaders is a member of the SWP and most of its activists are members of the SWP as well. It must also be noted that the SWP produces UAF’s banners and arranges just about everything it does, including UAF’s coffee mornings.

Despite all that, the UAF stresses that many of ‘signatories’ and ‘members’ are not SWP members. They included Sir Teddy Taylor (who likes Bob Marley and other black-type musicians) and David Cameron (who once smoked a joint but didn’t inhale). Because they were signatories and members, rather than activists, they did not do much, or anything, for UAF other than appear on its website.

It was also rumoured that Sir Teddy Taylor thought that UAF was a reggae band. As for Cameron, some say that he once ‘supported UAF because, like everyone else, he is against Islamophobia’and that ‘a few million Muslim votes will also come in handy’.

Another signatory is the Holocaust survivor Henry Guterman.This works well for the UAF image of anti-Semitism, despite the earlier remarks. The Jews Noam Chomsky and Norman Finkelstein, both on the verge of being Holocaust deniers and Jewish anti-Semites, also support UAF.

History

Unite Against Fascism was formed in late 2003 when racism and fascism were invented by the SWP in order to politicise young Muslims and a couple of gullible first-year students.

It is said that it was set up primarily in response to British National Party’s electoral gains. The BNP had one MP and two MEPs, which some have said ‘is infinitesimal when compared to the numbers of politicians,councillors, national journalists and academics who support the far left’.

According to Red Pepper (a far-left magazine), UAF was set up by the far-left SWP and the National Assembly Against Racism.

In 2005 the anti-fascist Communist magazine Searchlight disaffiliated from the Trotskyist UAF after an argument over tactics to defeat the BNP and the fact that UAF was a ‘front for the SWP’. Searchlight favoured debate and public humiliation of the BNP whereas the SWP, sorry, the UAF, favoured kicking BNP arse at demos and stuff and putting right wingers in gulags on the Isle of White.

At Unite Against Fascism’s 2007 national conference, the speakers included the former Cabinet minister and ex-Trot Peter Hain. He said that he ‘simply adored brown and black people’and that he ‘reads the Koran every night, just before he reads ‘the Bhagavad Gita, the Upanishads, the Torah, the Analects, the Talmud and the Bible’.

Dr Muhammad Abdul Bary of the Muslim Council of Britain (not to be confused with the Muslim Association of Britain, which is even more Islamist) also attended and he said that he also read ‘the Koran, just before reading Mein Kampf ’ (by Eddie Hitler) and ‘saying a few prayers for the annihilation of the Jews… sorry, Zionists’.

UAF and Violence

On the 9th of June, 2009, UAF demonstrated against a press conference given by Nick Griffin (outside the Houses of Parliament) by the democratic means of throwing eggs and threatening violence. This followed the election of Griffin as an MEP, one of the massive number of two BNP MEPs (which is nearly a tiny fraction of the left-wing MEPs) at the time. The protesters also kicked Griffin’s racist car and beat it with placards (a white car) as he was led away from the scene. Two members of the public were hospitalised as a result of this UAF protest against BNP violence and thuggery.

UAF did similar things when the BNP attempted to hold a press conference at a pub in Miles Platting, north of Manchester, the following day. They chanted red-fascist sentiments and tried to drown out Nick Griffin by playing speeches from Fidel Castro, Stalin and Yusuf Al-Qaradawi. One protester was arrested after spitting in the direction of a racist car belonging to a BNP member. Some UAF members have said that ‘he should have bombed the car’. But the SWP/UAF says it ‘does not believe in terrorism itself because it is individualist’ (rather than, say, morally wrong).

Police arrested 19 protesters during a demonstration by UAF against the British National Party’s ‘Red, White and Blue Festival’ in Codner, Derbyshire on Saturday August the 15th, 2009. Here again the UAF/SWP used its tried and tested and traditional approach of violence and intimidation.

UAF and the English Defence League

UAF has also demonstrated against the English Defence League (EDL) for daring to criticise Islam and Muslims (who are, some say, ‘so useful to the UAF/SWP cause’).

The EDL does not support the BNP and has condemned racism as well. UAF has responded by saying that ‘any criticism of Islam is, quite simply, racism’ (the criticism of Jews ‘is not racism’).

On August 2009 the EDL clashed with UAF at a protest in Birmingham, resulting in 35 arrests. Later that month the EDL was banned for three months in Luton (the site, in March 2009, of an Islamist protest against British troops recently returning from Afghanistan) for making the UAF attack them and making Muslim youths riot.

Further violent clashes between EDL and the UAF occurred on September 5, 2009, again in Birmingham, resulting in 90 arrests. The EDL has since said that it will not be returning to Birmingham because it doesn’t like making UAF members violent or Muslim hooligans riot. It apologies profusely to the far-left, violent and anti-democratic UAF/SWP for daring to practice the right of free speech.

Conclusion

Some critics have asked UAF/SWP why it does not protest against the extreme Islamist groups, Hizb ut-Tahrir, Muslim Against Crusades, etc. It has responded by saying that ‘Hizb ut-Tahrir is not a racist group’. However, the critics responded to this by saying:

‘No, but it is fascist. It also calls for the annihilation of the state of Israel. And, eventually, for a theocracy and the death of all non-Muslims.’

‘Yes, but it is not racist,’ UAF said again.

‘And, in any case, it is not as extreme as the English Defence League, which calls for a footballfanocracy as well as the extermination of all students.’

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