The subjects covered in this blog include Slavoj Žižek, IQ tests, Chomsky, Tony Blair, Baudrillard, global warming, sociobiology, Islam, Islamism, Marx, Foucault, National/International Socialism, economics, the Frankfurt School, philosophy, anti-racism, etc... I've had articles published in The Conservative Online, American Thinker, Intellectual Conservative, Human Events, Faith Freedom, Brenner Brief (Broadside News), New English Review, etc... (Paul Austin Murphy's Philosophy can be found here.)
This blog used to be called EDL Extra. I was a supporter (neither a member nor a leader) of the EDL until 2012. This blog has retained the old web address.

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Thursday, 1 April 2010

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown's Bad Muslims

Why does Yasmin Alibhai-Brown believe that her bad Muslims are not ‘real Muslims’? Likewise, why did she believe that Bush and Blair, amongst many others, were 'not real Christians’? Why can’t the baddies be ‘real’ Muslims? And what about the numerous references to – violent! – jihad in the Koran?

Islam deals in Truth with a capital ‘T’. It doesn't deal in ‘provisional truths’ like science. Indeed scientific truths are often ‘ephemeral’ (hence ‘the bankruptcy of science’ – Tolstoy). Consequently, when religions which deal in Truth collide, then all hell is often let loose.

One Muslim says that ‘the Koran does not make mistakes, unlike other religions’. A Christian in the United States says something similar about the Bible. Is it any wonder that these religions, both the True Religion, are at each other’s throats? But why are these ‘fundamentalists’ deemed to be the ‘distorters’ by Alibhai-Brown?

These fundamentalists aren’t distorters. Those who follow their words are the ‘true Muslims’. Alibhai-Brown doesn’t like this because the acceptance of such fundamentalisms is almost bound to lead to more bloodletting, not less.

Yasmin Alibhai-Brown is trying her best to square a circle. She is attempting to turn Islam into some kind of empirical pursuit, complete with the necessary frustrations which accompany the provisional and ephemeral truths of such a pursuit. The problem is that some – most? – religious people don’t like to be frustrated in their search for truth. That’s why they choose religion. Hence the Twin Towers.

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